Traditionally, advertising has represented a kind of ideal world. The important thing has not been so much that it represented the consumer as it was but rather how it aspired to be. For this reason, advertisements have always been a kind of brighter, more positive and more radiant vision of reality. The key was not so much that the consumer identified with the protagonist of the ad, but that how that protagonist was aligned with the idealized vision of how he would like to be.But advertising has had to change and has had to adapt to social changes and, above all, to what consumers expect to find in advertisements. Advertising has had to examine its conscience – or should be doing it – about what the world it represents is like and what that is transmitting to consumers.The first point in which advertising has had to think about what it does and how it does it is in relation to gender stereotypes. Consumers and consumers have begun to get fed up (especially the former) with how women are represented in advertisements and what is being tried to say by it.

Change genderIt is not only a critique of the idealized visions that advertisements have been transmitting using models and modifying their bodies with tricks in post-production, but also the way in which women are spoken and positioned. The women in advertisements can no longer be mere sex objects or mere decorative objects. That has led to the way things were announced five or ten years ago no longer work today.Women have been the protagonists of the clearest clichés throughout the history of advertising, but not only have they been reduced to certain roles in advertisements and it is not only from that point that the market has begun to show fed up. Representations of men have also been questioned and have also been pushed to be reinvented to be more in line with what is expected at this time and hour.Possibly the best example to understand this is how the image of parents in advertisements has changed.

The father used to be a kind of Switzerland WhatsApp Number List comic element, the ‘useless’ who did not know how to change a diaper in the ad. Now ads have started portraying parents in a less stereotypical way.But the problem is not only in reducing the burden of stereotypes, but also in who star in the ads and what they are like and what they do. Faced with increasingly diverse societies, advertisements remain much more homogeneous. And consumers begin to feel that they no longer represent them.Ads are not relevantTo sample a button: A recent study has looked at how Londoners feel about ads and how they look on them. The study, produced by the UCL Institute of Education at the request of the mayor of the city and the Greater London Authority, wanted to study how advertisements seen in public areas of the city affect consumers.

According to their conclusions, that advertising does not connect with them.75% of Londoners actually believe that advertising does not represent the diversity of the city and only one in three believe that the ads are relevant to them. The opinions of those surveyed suggest that the ads lack diversity both in terms of age, sexual orientation and cultural origins of their protagonists.And much of the blame for this is marked by how women are represented. “The lack of diversity in advertising in London is basically due to the fact that the women we see are limited to a limited range of idealized body types and looks, which do not represent the diversity of London,” says Jessica Ringrose, the lead researcher at London. study.

In the case of women over 55, for example, they assured that they felt irrelevant and invisible in advertising terms.In fact, this last point is one of those that studies tend to point out as problematic and that is generating a greater separation between those who receive the ads and their connection with them. Baby boomers feel that brands forget them and that the representations they show of them are too topical and far removed from their life experiences. 82% of those over 55 feel that stores do not think of them.Traditionally, advertising has represented a kind of ideal world. The important thing has not been so much that it represented the consumer as it was but rather how it aspired to be.

For this reason, advertisements have always been a kind of brighter, more positive and more radiant vision of reality. The key was not so much that the consumer identified with the protagonist of the ad, but that how that protagonist was aligned with the idealized vision of how he would like to be.But advertising has had to change and has had to adapt to social changes and, above all, to what consumers expect to find in advertisements. Advertising has had to examine its conscience – or should be doing it – about what the world it represents is like and what that is transmitting to consumers.The first point in which advertising has had to think about what it does and how it does it is in relation to gender stereotypes.

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